Join Us to Celebrate Art and Inspiration on the Farm!

Image of watercolor painting; text: Art on the farm at Gaining Ground, exhibit and online installation

We are installing a self-guided farm tour featuring artwork created by Gaining Ground friends, partner organizations, and artists throughout our community. Art on the Farm kicks off on Saturday, Sept. 10, and will continue through Friday, Oct. 14. 

Please pay us a visit anytime during the month-long installation and celebrate art and nature while engaging with questions around farming and food access. You can enjoy a selection of thought-provoking drawings, paintings, collages, and photographs while you walk through the natural beauty and thrumming activity of our hunger-relief farm.

We have also created a virtual version of the exhibition. Below you can view every artwork from the installation in an accessible online catalog.

This exhibit is free and open to the public. We welcome you to engage with us in continually thinking and learning about the natural world, hunger-relief, and the need for a just, equitable food system. 

Art on the Farm is made possible by the generous support of the Nellie Leaman Taft Foundation.


Opening Day Celebration

On Saturday, Sept. 10, from 10:30 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., join us at Gaining Ground to kick off Art on the Farm!

We will have information about the farm’s hunger-relief work and volunteer opportunities, Gaining Ground tote bags and cookbooks available for purchase, and seed-planting activities for our younger visitors. Be sure to take part in a guided farm tour, which we will be holding at 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 2:00 p.m.

This same day, you will be able to visit us in Concord Center, where we will have a booth set up as a part of Ag Day festivities from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.

We hope to see you then!


Our 2022 Art Collection

Amelia Ash, Lexington High School. I have always thought apple trees were beautiful. I love how the branches grow so heavy with fruit each fall. To me, they symbolize the abundance of food that the earth can provide. I recently learned about the practice of gleaning and how many orchards allow volunteers to come in after the public harvest to collect the remaining fruit and share it with people who are experiencing food insecurity. I chose to paint a branch of an apple tree because it is a beautiful representation of how our local farms and orchards can provide healthy food for all members of our community. Farmers can earn a living by selling apples and there is still plenty to share with those who need it.


Ainsley Carter, “Food as Art” (food). These beautiful flowers were made from cut bananas, chocolate syrup, sugar, and flowers in the middle, for an extra touch. Food can become beautiful pieces of art  – that’s one thing I like about food. 


Pippa Farber-Nurok, “Food is Gold” (clay)


Arianna Quayle, Concord-Carlisle High School (Rabbit)


Arianna Quayle, Concord-Carlisle High School (Mountains)


Arianna Quayle, Concord-Carlisle High School (Ram)


Concord Recreation Camp/Concord Free Public Library: Campers stopped by the Main Library this summer to paint tiles that reflect the work of farmers and nature.


Erick, Bridge Boston Charter School (Cornfield)


Jaelyn Lucien, Intern at the Clubhouse Network, Boston “Watermelon” (watercolor)


Jane Paulson, “Cabbage” (cut paper)


Jane Paulson, “Thorns” (cut paper); the green layer is an enlarged detail of a photograph; the underlayer suggests water nourishing the mat of thorns.


Jane Paulson, “Puddle” (cut paper)


Kaena, Intern at The Clubhouse Network, Boston, “Pinocchio Time Kaws” (markers)


Katy Meyer-McEwen, “Abundance” (acrylic paint)


Katy Meyer-McEwen, “Colorful Carrots” (acrylic paint)


Kayden Noel, Intern at The Clubhouse Network, Boston, “Broken King” (acrylic paint)


Laurie Engdahl, “Anna at the Wash Station” (watercolor); Anna is the farm manager at Gaining Ground.  I wanted to capture the activities of the farmers and, in particular, the tasks that may otherwise go unnoticed in their work of growing and distributing nutritious food.


Maggie Stanley, “Sun Worship.”  The reference photo is from the Gaining Ground farm. The lushness of the squash leaves angling to drink in the sun reminded me of how miraculous and genius biology is.  Nature is not ours, we are Nature’s.


Margot Kimball (Founder of Art for All, West Concord), “The Banquet.”  This mural hangs on the wall of Debra’s Next Door in West Concord. Debra Stark commissioned Margot to paint this mural and the mural “Heaven” in the Spring of 2021. Together they chose the imagery and quotes to reflect Debra’s commitment to building a better world through good food and positive sourcing practices.


Margot Kimball (Founder of Art for All, West Concord), “Heaven.” This mural hangs on the wall of Debra’s Next Door in West Concord. Debra Stark commissioned Margot to paint this mural and the mural “The Banquet” in the Spring of 2021. Together they chose the imagery and quotes to reflect Debra’s commitment to building a better world through good food and positive sourcing practices.


Rami Z., “Nature Girl.” Clients of Minute Man Arc’s Day Habilitation Program gathered natural materials outside our headquarters on Forest Ridge Road. Flowers, acorns, leaves and twigs were collected and carefully arranged to create a “Nature Girl.” Foraging in the wood connected individuals to the natural beauty of Concord. Minute Man Arc is a lifespan organization supporting more than 1,000 children and adults with disabilities in eastern Massachusetts.


Rachel Desulme, Intern at The Clubhouse Network, Boston, “Appa” (scratchboard)


Bruce D, John M., Ravi S., and Lillian R., “Rainbow Sunflower Tree.” Clients of Minute Man Arc’s Day Habilitation Program planted and grew a giant sunflower at the Rodgers Community Garden in West Concord. The sunflower was dried over the winter so individuals could harvest the seeds and paint them a rainbow of colors before placing them on a tree drawing. Minute Man Arc is a lifespan organization supporting more than 1,000 children and adults with disabilities in eastern Massachusetts.


Thomas Ash, Jonas Clark Middle School, Lexington. This artwork represents the sharing of nutritious food.


Barbara Paugh, “Red Horse” (encaustic). Red Horse is a representational work depicting a horse reveling in the freedom of his pasture. It illustrates that farms are essential not only for growing food, but also for helping to preserve open land, benefiting and nurturing many diverse life forms.


Finn Feist, Concord-Carlisle High School, “Apple” and “Pear” The fruit series began as a way of cheering myself up during the loneliness of the Covid lockdown. Their vibrant colors, aesthetics, and natural sweetness make fruits the happiest foods imaginable.


Finn Feist, Concord-Carlisle High School, “Fig” from Finn’s Fruit Series


Finn Feist, Concord-Carlisle High School, “Watermelon” from Finn’s Fruit Series


Finn Feist, Concord-Carlisle High School, “Strawberry” from Finn’s Fruit Series


Atticus Farber-Nurok, “A Model Farm” (clay)


Ava McEwen, “Sunset Over the Barn” (acrylic paint)


Tamara Fils-Aime, C2C Pathways Coordinator at The Clubhouse Network, Boston “Stump”


Kahmal London, Flagship Clubhouse Manager at the Clubhouse Network, Boston


Jane Paulson, “Aerial Landscape” (cut paper)


Finn Feist, Concord-Carlisle High School, “Grapefruit” from Finn’s Fruit Series


Finn Feist, Concord-Carlisle High School, “Lemons” from Finn’s Fruit Series

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